SALI

SALI

Tuesday, 14 January 2020 21:43

Get ready for the 2020 Lifestyle Design Show

Interested in innovative landscaping for small spaces in South Africa?

The 2020 Lifestyle Design Show, which launches on 15 February,  focuses on patio living, landscaping small balconies, as well as small and micro gardens.

The South African Landscaper's Institute (SALI) is joining the battle to fight the invasive polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) beetle that poses a serious threat to both exotic and indigenous trees across South Africa.

The beetle is known to invade the host tree and bore holes in the branches. If undetected, it can destroy a tree within a relatively short period of time.

Adult beetles invade a variety of tree species and dig tunnels to lay eggs. The PSHB beetles then transport a fungus which attacks the tree’s vascular tissue, causing a disease called fusarium dieback (FD).

FD in turn interrupts the supply of water and nutrients to the tree. It’s known that PSHB attacks more than 300 tree species countrywide of which more than 130 of these species are susceptible to FD.

The PSHB beetle attacks a variety of tree species which include oak, most willows, plane trees, avocado, some acacias and most maples.

Reports quoting academic research show that, in other parts of the country, more than 10 000 trees have been lost which could have an adverse effect on the ecosystem and take years to replace.

Metropolitan areas such as Johannesburg and Durban as well as Pietermaritzburg, George and Knysna have lost thousands of trees.

How can you help?

    1.  Contact a SALI landscaper to advise if you have a PSHB invasion in the trees on your property.

    2.  Distribute the TWO education posters on the PSHB beetles prepared by SALI. 

Poster 1:  Are your trees dying

    Click here to download the banner:   Are your trees dying?

SALI PSHB BrochurePS

 

Poster 2:  Help STOP the spread of polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) beetle

    Click here to download the banner:   Help stop the spread of polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) beetle.

SALI PSHB StopPS

The Johannesburg International Flower Show (30 October - 3 November 2019) at Waterfall City has announced their collaboration with a host of South Africa’s leading industry experts who will play an integral role in creating a floral wonderland.

Preparations for the Johannesburg International Flower Show have begun! Civil engineers and heavy machinery have arrived on site at the Waterfall City show site, just below the Mall of Africa in Midrand, Johannesburg. Their aim is to prepare the grounds for the lavish and exotic garden displays for the show that launches on 30 October, 2019

On 9 April, 2019, the City of Cape Town confirmed that the invasive polyphagous shot hole borer  (PSHB) beetle was positively identified in Somerset West.

The PSBH infestation was discovered in Oldenland Road, Somerset West by passionate gardeners and environmentalists who noted that a London plane tree in their garden was ailing and exhibited signs of a PSHB beetle invasion.

Interested in innovative landscape trends in South Africa?

The 2019 Lifestyle Design Show features seven 'Chelsea Flower Show' style gardens - combined into a single landscape entity.  

The theme of the show is la vie est belle, meaning 'Life is Beautiful' and the gardens are a celebration of French influences in local landscaping styles.

Interested in landscapes?   Visit the 'Gardens of the Golden City' - Summer Open Gardens, Gauteng, South Africa.

Attend an open garden and raise funds for charity.  Visit open gardens in Westcliff, Randburg and Hyde Park. 

Weekend of 6 - 7 April, 2019: 10am - 4pm

Heritage Garden, 19 Pallinghurst Drive, Westcliff, Johannesburg, Gauteng South Africa 

Google Map with directions

  • In November 2013, the owners started rejuvenating this Old World Garden as they wanted to bring it back to its former glory.
  • The approach was to create light by pruning the old trees enough to create filtered sun as many of the beds were in deep shade.
  • Once that had been achieved the beds needed trenching and feeding with tonnes of compost and organic fertilizer.
  • Here is a mix of roses, Buddleja 'Buzz', penstemons, mixed salvia and cascading convolvulus interspersed with annuals for the season.
  • A touch of old fashioned herbs like achillea have worked to bring seasonal colour.
  • The shade gardens have a mix of plectranthus, impatiens, arums,and hydrangeas. Forest bell bush (Mackaya bella) is often used in the shade beds to close back ground walls.
  • The edges of the beds gravel driveways have been defined by the natural rock boarders, so typical of Westcliff.

Tea Garden

Contact:  Margreet 072 400 1559 or Lynne 082 689 0930

Entrance:  R50 per person   Children under 12 free

19 PallinghurstPS

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Weekend of 5, 6 & 7 April, 2019 (3 DAYS): 10am - 4pm

Beechwood Garden, 25 Christopherson Rd, Hyde Park

Beechwood Garden together with Shari Dickinson’s Easter Market will be open.

This classical landscaped 3.5 acre garden was designed by pioneer landscape architect Joane Pim and redesigned by the current owners. The garden surrounds a magnificent old-world house, designed by Steffen Ahrends. An interesting garden feature is a forest setting with pathways leading to an English styled rose garden where several ponds provide perfect examples of water-garden planting. A magnificent sunken kitchen garden will give you inspiration for your own vegetable garden.

The garden which has heritage status well worth a visit. It is accessible by wheel chair and has smooth pathways for people with limited mobility.

Entrance: R50 (Children under 12 free).

Contact Margreet: 072 400 1559 or Helena: 083 267 1661

Beechwood Gardens KM 2013 1 PS

Beechwood Gardens KM 2013 77PS

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Weekend of 25-26 May, 2019: 10am - 4pm

ALOE Ridge

303C Olievenhout Avenue, Northriding

Google Map with directions.

'Aloe Ridge' is a 6700m indigenous garden is set in the North Riding Agricultural Holdings Valley just below the Northgate Dome.

There are over 300 planted South African indigenous tree species growing amongst the original Ancient African Olives, Mountain Karee, Bushman’s Poison, Common Hook Thorn, Red leaf Rock Fig and Rock Elder clusters located in the area.

There are roughly 600 aloes dispersed throughout the garden in sandstone rockeries along with shrubs, bulbs and indigenous grasses. Under the shade of the trees are dense patches of Plectanthus (spurflowers) and other indigenous shade plants creating a forest floor effect under the tree canopies.

As most of the trees and shrubs are not labelled, it is advisable to bring a tree spotting book such as Sappi Tree Spotting for the Highveld.

Entrance R30 (Children under 12 free). Tea Garden.

Contact Margreet 072 400 1559 or Helena 083 267 1661

Aloe Ridge PS

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SALI thanks the member garden clubs of the Gardens of the Golden City for their charity initiatives. 

All Seasons Garden Club - Annette Bohler 082 879 8962
Bedfordview Garden Club - Pam Heller-Stern 083 496 4756
Country Garden Club - Cecile Price 084 819 9085
Johannesburg Garden Club - Helena Mitchell 083 267 1661
Randburg Horticultural Society - Lynne Ludolph 082 689 0930
Shady Ladies - Nikki Ireland 082 902 9106
The Horticultural Society - Glynne Case 082 663 8498
Thirty Something Garden Club - Barbara Wassenaar 072 234 4120

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 Past Open Gardens (... hope you enjoyed them ... )
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Weekend of 23/24 February 2019 (10am-5pm)

'Aloe Ridge', 303C Olievenhout Avenue,  North Riding AH, Roodepoort, 2169

Google Map with directions.

About the garden:  Aloe Ridge a 6700 m indigenous garden is set in the North Riding Agricultural Holdings Valley just below the Northgate Dome. There are over 300 planted South African indigenous tree species growing amongst the original Ancient African Olives, Mountain Karee, Bushman’s Poison, Common Hook Thorn, Red leaf Rock Fig and Rock Elder clusters located in the area.

There are roughly 600 aloes dispersed throughout the garden in sandstone rockeries along with shrubs, bulbs and indigenous grasses. Under the shade of the trees are dense patches of Plectanthus (spurflowers) and other indigenous shade plants creating a forest floor effect under the tree canopies.

  Saturday, 23 February (14h00)

      Talk:  'Indigenous Plants and your Garden' by Malcolm Hepplewhite. 

      Venue:  Bea Thompson Hall, Witkoppen Wildflower Nursery, Aloe Ridge 303C Olievenhout Avenue, Northriding, Randburg.

  • A look at what an indigenous plant is...
  • Why we should be planting indigenous plants...
  • Tips on how to make indigenous gardening easier and successful.

  Sunday,  24 February (11h00) 

     Talk:   'Shady Gardening Issues' by Malcolm Hepplewhite.

     Venue:  Bea Thompson Hall, Witkoppen Wildflower Nursery, Aloe Ridge 303C Olievenhout Avenue, Northriding, Randburg.

  •        A  look at the two main sources of shade in gardens and how to approach gardening in each type.
  •       We also look at some indigenous garden plants that happily grow in shade.

As the show garden is quite shady the talk 'Shady Affairs' will be quite appropriate. So you can have a look at the garden, enjoy a cup of tea and cake at the show garden, listen to the talk at the NURSERY and, as long as you keep the ticket, come back again and have a second look at the garden with a different view.

  • Entrance:  R50.00 inclusive of a talk by Malcolm Hepplewhite at the Witkoppen Wildflower Nursery which is about 100m from the show garden.
  • When you present your ticket from the garden, the talk is for free and you get 10% discount on all plants. Children under 12 are free.  Entrance to only the talk - R50.00.

Contact:   Margreet 072 400 1559   Helena 083 267 1661

Please visit the Tea Garden at the show garden.

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9/10 March 2019 (10am-5pm)

CHOC House, 16 Eastwold Way, Saxonwold, Johannesburg.

Google Map with Directions

As CHOC is celebrating its 40th birthday this year we are delighted that we have the opportunity to open the garden for you to enjoy.

  • The garden provides a peaceful and healing retreat for the families of children fighting cancer and is maintained with love by the “Garden Fairies” from the Country Garden Club.
  • It shows off a wide diversity of plants and huge trees provide a welcome shade in the play area so the children can play happily.
  • A magnificent vegetable garden provides fresh vegetables for the children to have a healthy meal.
  • By visiting the CHOC garden you support such a worthwhile , deserving and needy cause.

Contact:   Margreet - 072 400 1559   Helena - 083 267 1661

Tea Garden

Entrance: R50   Children under 12 years free.

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The South African Landscaper's Institute (SALI) is joining the battle to fight the invasive polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) beetle that poses a serious threat to both exotic and indigenous trees across South Africa.

The beetle is known to invade the host tree and bore holes in the branches. If undetected, it can destroy a tree within a relatively short period of time.

Adult beetles invade a variety of tree species and dig tunnels to lay eggs. The PSHB beetles then transport a fungus which attacks the tree’s vascular tissue, causing a disease called fusarium dieback (FD).

FD in turn interrupts the supply of water and nutrients to the tree. It’s known that PSHB attacks more than 300 tree species countrywide of which more than 130 of these species are susceptible to FD.

The PSHB beetle attacks a variety of tree species which include oak, most willows, plane trees, avocado, some acacias and most maples.

Reports quoting academic research show that, in other parts of the country, more than 10 000 trees have been lost which could have an adverse effect on the ecosystem and take years to replace.

Metropolitan areas such as Johannesburg and Durban as well as Pietermaritzburg, George and Knysna have lost thousands of trees.

How can you help?

    1.  Contact a SALI landscaper to advise if you have a PSHB invasion in the trees on your property.

    2.  Distribute the TWO education posters on the PSHB beetles prepared by SALI. 

Poster 1:  Are your trees dying

    Click here to download the banner:   Are your trees dying?

SALI PSHB BrochurePS

 

Poster 2:  Help STOP the spread of polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) beetle

    Click here to download the banner:   Help stop the spread of polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) beetle.

SALI PSHB StopPS

SALI landscapers are experts in wetland-scaping - the creation of ecologically-friendly wetlands landscaped by professionals. 

World Wetlands Day (2 February) is a good time to think about the importance of creating wetlands around your home or business. 

The theme for the 2019 World Wetlands Day on February 2 is ‘Wetlands: The key to coping with climate change'. 

In 1971 the environmental value of wetlands was finally recognised by governments throughout the world. On February 2 of that year the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands was signed. The convention is an intergovernmental treaty that provides the framework for national action and international cooperation for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources.

It is so named as it took place in the Iranian city of Ramsar on the shores of the Caspian Sea. The date of the signing, February 2, was designated as World Wetlands Day. South Africa is a signatory to the Ramsar Convention. 

What are the benefits of wetlands? Wetlands are like stepping stones and form vital links in the chain of water supply across semi-arid South Africa.

Natural sponges

Wetlands act as natural sponges that hold water during rainy seasons and reduce the danger of floods and soil erosion.

  • They release water slowly during drought periods.
  • They purify the water that passes through them.
  • They provide food, housing materials and traditional medicines for local communities.
  • Wetlands are also extremely rich in biodiversity and many species of plants, animals, birds and insects cannot survive without wetlands.

Wetlands are under siege, as a result It is estimated that 50% of South Africa’s wetlands have been destroyed through development, water pollution and general human growth. As a result, species dependent on wetlands are declining faster than those reliant on other ecosystems.

WWD SpongePS

Develop a wetland

South African landscapers are at the forefront of wetland-scaping. When large tracts of land have been approved for development as housing estates, golf estates and business parks, landscapers identify mini wetland areas and incorporate them into their plans.

Some landscapers identify low lying areas and develop them into attractive wetland areas with appropriate plants which in turn provide an ecosystem for endangered wildlife. 

Award winning wetlands created by SALI professionals

There are a host of award winning - and outstanding - landscaped wetlands to be found in South Africa.  Here a just a few examples: 

 1 SALI Wetlands ConstantiaKM PS

Constantia, Cape Town (Marina Landscapes)

2WetlandsAlan DawsonPS

 Cape Town (Alan Dawson Gardens)

3 WetlandsHartbeesspruit UniPta ServestPS

Hartbeesspruit, University of Pretoria (Servest)

1 Wetland SALI 2014PS

Cape Town (Vula Environmental Landscapes

Monday, 28 January 2019 13:25

Flufftail celebrated on World Wetlands Day

Do you have a wetland?  Would a wetland benefit your landscape?  Do you need a SALI landscaper to install a wetland on your property?

World Wetlands Day (2 February) is a great time to remember the importance of wetlands and water birds in the landscape. 

One of the biggest events during World Wetland Week will be the 5th Annual Flufftail Festival which takes place at the Johannesburg Zoo & National Zoological Garden.

What is a Flufftail?

The White-winged Flufftail is a critically endangered wetland bird discovered in the moist, high altitude Middelpunt Wetland in the Greater Lakenvlei Protected Environment at Dullstroom, Mpumalanga in 1981.

For decades Birdlife experts believed the secretive white-winged flufftail, one of the world’s rarest birds, bred in just one place: the moist high-altitude Berga Wetland in Ethiopia. Then it was found in South Africa.

Alarming population estimates suggest there are around 250 of these birds globally, and only around 50 remaining in South Africa. As a wetland ground nesting species, the critically endangered Flufftail has become a poster pin up for the need to protect, nuture and extend wetland habitats across South Africa.

White winged flufftailPS

Honoring wetland birds

"We support the 2019 Flufftail Festival as an educational initiative which aims to create awareness on wetlands, water and water birds", says Norah de Wet, National Chairperson of SALI.

World Wetlands Day (2 February) and World Water Day (22 March) are ideal days to educate the public on wetlands, water and water birds.

The importance of wetlands, how they function and the role they in our society will be unpacked, particularly with regards to reducing the impacts of climate change.

The extreme weather conditions being experienced throughout the country is a reminder for constant education on the importance of water conservation and there is much to be learned at this year’s event.

Wetlands and education 

As part of the Flufftail Festival, approximately 500 Grade 6 learners will be exposed to the selected zoo’s on 8 February and 1 March while working through educational activities on water, wetlands and water birds.

In addition, approximately 400 community members will have an opportunity to explore the Johannesburg Zoo on 09 February and participate in the activities.

Members of the public will receive discounted entry fees on 2 & 3 March at the National Zoological Garden in Pretoria.

The World Wetlands Day - 2019 Flufftail Festival is hosted by Rand Water (Water Wise) together with BirdLife South Africa, Toyota, Gauteng Department of Agricultural and Rural Development (GDARD), Joburg City Parks and Zoo and the South African National Botanical Institute (SANBI).

cards07

Graphics courtesy of Birdlife SA.

FACT FILE

1. Celebration in Johannesburg

Date:  Friday 08 February 2019 and Saturday 09 February 2019

Venue:  Johannesburg Zoo, Parkview, Gauteng

 

2. Celebration in Pretoria

Date:  Friday 1 March 2019 and Saturday 2 March 2019 and Sunday 3 March 2019

Venue:  National Zoological Garden, Pretoria, Gauteng

 WWD19 logoPS

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